The Phoenix Network:
 
 
About  |  Advertise
Adult  |  Blogs  |  In Pictures
 

Incarceration inspires Jafar Panahi. Though under house arrest since 2010, and banned for 20 years from filmmaking, he made his first film in five years, This Is Not a Film (2011). He smuggled it out of the country in a cake. Like most of his films, it can't be shown in Iran.

That conviction was not his first run-in with confinement. He served a stint as a POW during the Iran-Iraq War in 1982, and his earliest bust came in April 2001, when the NYPD, alarmed by his Iranian citizenship, detained him at JFK airport, where he was waiting for a connection to Buenos Aires to attend a film festival. They released him the next day.

In 2003 he was arrested in Iran, and released after the authorities suggested that he leave the country. He declined, and ran out of luck in 2010, when he was arrested after showing support for the Iranian pro-democracy movement while attending the Montreal and Berlin film festivals. The court convicted him of "propaganda against the state," and sentenced him to a six-year term, which, after an unsuccessful appeal, he serves today.

While he was in Montreal, I interviewed him and asked if he was worried about the consequences of his outspokenness. He said "the power of cinema" would protect him. As he continues "not" making films, it seems he was right.

  Topics: Features , Middle East, Iran, Jafar Panahi,  More more >
| More


ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH



  |  Sign In  |  Register
 
thePhoenix.com:
Phoenix Media/Communications Group:
TODAY'S FEATURED ADVERTISERS
Copyright © 2014 The Phoenix Media/Communications Group